Blog Archives

Harbour of Industry

Toronto has an iconic shoreline and the downtown area known as Harbourfront was once home to many thriving industries that relied on waterways for transportation. In a less industrial era, the Redpath Sugar Building is one of last active refineries to be located along the shores of downtown Toronto. Opened in 1958, The Redpath Sugar Building is a sugar storage, refining and museum building and is a testament to the industrious history of the city of Toronto.

Along the Old Frontier

Another legendary route to walk along in Toronto is Front Street which has many historic sites along and express some of Toronto’s heritage in the downtown core. The street marks the rough outline of the shoreline of Lake Ontario as it existed during the original English settlement of York. The current shoreline is about 800m south as much of the inner harbour was filled in the late 19th and early 20th century for industrial development. These are some of the photos I took.

This is part of the North wall of the Canadian Opera Company.

St. James Anglican Cathedral can be seen in the background.

This is shot of the old St. Lawrence Hall which was a prominent public meeting hall during its day

The iconic Gooderham Building which is more commonly known as the Flatiron Building. Overall, Front Street proved to be a worthwhile photographic opportunity and was also a great time exploring my own neighbourhood. Has any one else seen any of these sights?  Tell me what you think.

The Beauty of Water

I thought I would share more of my photos from my time in Niagara Falls. One of the most fascinating parts of the experience there was seeing the rainbow(s) occurring. Over the basin of the falls there were, at times, double rainbows that were very visually apparent. Here are a few more photos that show the rainbows better.

 

 

This Is My Ontario

Ontario lakes are renowned for their diversity and beauty at any time, but the summer season provides a lush backdrop of stunning vistas that can be found all over cottage country. Whether you are out for an inspiring day paddle, or a rigorous challenge, these lakes provide some of the best experiences anywhere. After all the province’s name comes from the Huron word Ontarí:io which means “great lake” because Ontario contains about 250,000 freshwater lakes. These are some panoramic shots of lakes I was at this summer.

In the Wild

Summer adventures have come to a close and those weekends of great outdoors adventures will soon be transforming into other fall-orientated adventures. Nevertheless the fall is a time to look back on good times of the past summer. This summer I spent a lot of time in the great outdoors of Ontario. These are some photos of a canoe trek I took in the Kawartha Region.

 

 

 

 

These remind me of good times and I hope you too can appreciate the beauty of the outdoors and ones ability to be in peace with nature. Ontario- yours to discover!

Summer Fun in the Sun

The Summer is here and in full presence. The heat in Southern Ontario has been quite warm and constant which leads many people seeking opportunities to escape to the cottage country. Last weekend at my cottage it was very warm too and it was a time well spent in the lake.

The Common Crayfish is native to North America and lives in fast–flowing, cool, rocky streams as well as shallow lakes, such as my own lake. I caught this little guy and pulled him ashore to take photos then released him back in the water.

Summer time in cottage country is fabulous and is a true Ontario tradition. Anyone else have any great stories about being in cottage country or camping sites?

Down at the Docks

 

 

 

 

This past weekend I played tourist in my own city, Toronto. I visited the Portlands which is an industrial and rcreational neighborhood located just south-east of downtown. The Port Lands are mostly abandoned from the days of heavy industry but the area along the south shore of the Port Lands has become mostly recreational with a bird sanctuary two leisure marinas and plenty of bike paths. These are some of my photos of the adventure.

Life as a Sawyer

Again, on one of my photographic adventures through the wilderness surrounding my cottage in Northern Ontario I came across a spectacular insect. The white-spotted sawyer (Monochamus scutellatus) is an important wood-boring insect in North America.

Habitat

These photos portray an adult male

As it is still June many Sawyers have and will be laying eggs. In the northern part of its range, the white-spotted sawyer requires almost 2 years to complete its life cycle. So the eggs, then larvae will not emerge as the above adult for another two years, which in terms of insect lifespan is quite long. Have you ever seen this insect or have you ever been confused if it was an Asian Long-Horned beetle? I would be glad to hear your input.

As the Sun Sets

This is a collection of images taken of the sun setting behind the Toronto skyline. The first image is taken at around 8:00 PM and the last shot is taken at around 9:30 PM. Sunsets happen fairly quickly but they are worth watching as the sky and the lighting becomes magical before your eyes.

Have you ever watched the sunset? What emotions do you have while watching one? Feel free to leave links to sunset images you have taken too.

Spring Growth

Recently i was outside the city and in the countryside and was astonished at all the wonderful new year growth that was beginning to show itself. I was most interested in the various ferns that were beginning to grow and i thought i would share a few photos of what i saw.

This is a photo i took of a young set of fiddle heads coming up out of the ground. The Ostrich fern is a crown-forming, colony-forming fern, occurring in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

This Cinnamon Fern is native to the Americas and Eastern Asia and grows in moist woodlands.

I believe this is a Marsh Fern but i may be wrong. It prefers to grow in marshy situations in full sun.